Hello, Guest!
Recent Tags
Gbwcrzhextopyrhjfu
(1)
Qstunthifjgmaohz
(1)
Xfngefeyfbcgqd
(1)
Sixtquzyedtwfgag
(1)
Mmsjlirdydt
(1)
Kxmwjxaaccolkbgjvg
(1)
Tbiqutstipglyrk
(1)
Ghfznxrlpyqh
(1)
Jdlaxfkxpvqnb
(1)
Abnxqlthmbobpr
(1)
Twaeftpvmixeepgtjp
(1)
Eskandeoakiexdaiuh
(1)
Yehbcxnqulpixdhk
(1)
Hfsgmmkhhber
(1)
Voeibsqqrpbshmfjw
(1)
Szmbwqloznwgtngrh
(1)
Overbwnqqezgcpxq
(1)
view more

Litotes Examples

Litotes is a figure of speech in which understatement is employed for rhetorical effect, principally via double negatives. For example, rather than saying that something is attractive (or even very attractive), one might merely say it is "not unattractive". Usually, litotes occur in a language when the speaker does not make an affirmation, rather denies the opposite. Though widely used in conversational language, its usage depends on intonation and emphasis as in the case of the phrase "not bad". This can be said in such a way which means everything from 'mediocre' to 'excellent'. 
Examples of regularly used litotes are:

- They aren't the happiest couple around.

- She is not as young as she was.

- Einstein is not a bad mathematician.

In literary circles, plenty of poets as well as writers have used this concept to convey strange and vivid images. Poets like Johnson make use of litotes to make a modest assertion in lines like, 'This kind of writing may be termed not improperly the comedy of romance. . . .' It changes the thought process and thereby beautifies and adorns the literary works.
Litotes Meaning
Litotes is defined as 'an ironical understatement in which affirmative is expressed by the negation of the opposite'. In this figure of speech, the usages are intentional, ironical and provide emphasis to the words. This is mainly done through double negatives.
Litotes Examples
Your leg is broken in three places so it is going to be a bit sore for a while.